Fruit Juice Not Whole Nutrition

I Could’ve had a V8

Fruit Juice Not Whole NutritionI rarely watch TV commercials, mainly because they tend to enrage me. Sometimes, one enrages me to the point that I have to talk about it. Recently, this has happened with the V8 V-Fusion commercials.

They show the people, children and adults, drinking this juice and magically having consumed a serving of fruit and vegetables. Really? Is it the same thing?

My initial suspicion is that it just wasn’t possible. So I did my homework.

What should your first check be? Read the ingredients! You’ll find things like reconstituted vegetable juice blend and reconstituted fruit juice blend. Sounds yummy!

So it’s really only the juice – not the fruits and vegetables. What have you lost?

  1. The skin – an excellent source of fiber, carotenoids and flavonoids.
  2. The pulp – another excellent source of flavonoids and fiber. Plus, the pulp
    and Vitamin C act together in the body. So you get a much better benefit if
    you get them together.
  3. Other nutrients.

What’s left? Really what you’re getting is concentrated fructose. Unless you’re unfortunate enough to get a juice with added sugar or high fructose corn syrup.

My conclusion? Convenience comes at a cost. In this case, the cost is a much less nutritious food than the original. You can’t fool Mother Nature. If she had wanted you to drink just the juice, she would have presented it that way.

Photo Courtesy Erik Forsberg via Flickr

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I'm now an author and publisher. I write a blog over at And I have a book published - “Lessons of an Opening Heart."
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2 thoughts on “I Could’ve had a V8”

  1. Barbara, This is so true. I had a friend who used to drink those “green” drinks by the case. He thought he was being so “healthy” and he was a chef. He also consumed Vitamin water, which is also deluding the public. He was trying to get off “sugar” and never knew that those green drinks are loaded with sugar, plus each bottle is 2-3 servings so the sugar content can be misleading. The moral of the story is: Never trust advertisers…

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